Other Exotic Animals

Other Exotic Animals

Drive Through Pricing

Cash or NC check No Debit or Credit Cards Adult $11.00 Children (2-11) $8.00 Seniors (60+) $8.00 Feed $3.00 (64oz bucket)

Wagon Ride Pricing

SUSPENDED FOR COVID-19 Cash or NC check No Debit or Credit Cards Call for Reservations Adult $16.00 Children (2-11) $11.00 Seniors (60+) $11.00 1 bucket included for every 2 people Price includes admission

Hours of Operation

Monday through Saturday, 9am until 5:30pm, arrive by 4 Sunday 12pm - 5:30pm, arrive by 4

Other Exotic Animals

The Lazy 5 Ranch has a variety of other animals from around the world to view and learn about.

Vietnamese Pot-bellied Pig

Scientific Name: Sus scrofa domestica

Range: Jungles of China and Vietnam
Height: 10-12 inches
Weight: avg. 125 lbs.
Life Span: 12-18 Years

Vietnamese Pot-Bellied Pigs were introduced to the U.S. as pets around 1985. Their backbone is bent like a saddle, causing the abdomen to nearly drag on the ground. This is where they get the pot-bellied name. At birth piglets normally weigh about 1 pound. Pot-bellied pigs are intelligent and can be taught to do simple tricks and to walk on a leash. In fact pigs in general are considered to the smartest animals in the world, but the only trick the Lazy 5 pot-bellies know is how to make your feed disappear!

Vietnamese Pot-bellied Pig

Red Kangaroo

Red Kangaroo

Scientific Name: Macropus rufus

Range: Australia
Height: 65 inches
Weight: 40-200 lbs.
Life Span: 13 years

Red Kangaroos, also called Giant Red Kangaroos, are the largest living marsupials. They have a tail as long as 42 inches that is used as a balance mechanism when they jump. The Kangaroos can not walk, instead they hop very high. Red Kangaroos are the best jumpers of all mammals and can jump as high as 28 feet in distance and 6 feet in height; their speed exceeds 30 mph. The male Red Kangaroo is usually of reddish color and the female is bluish-gray. Females that are quicker than males are called does, flyers, roo or Jill, while adult males are called bucks, boomers, or jack, and a baby is called a joey.

Dromedary Camel

Scientific name: Camelus dromedarius

Range: North Africa, Middle East
Height: 6-7 Feet at shoulder, 6-8 feet to hump
Weight: 1000-1500
Gestation: 390-410

Did you know the Camel is originally from North America? About 10 million years ago it spread to other continents and 2 million years ago became extinct in North America. Then a mere 5,000 years ago the camel was domesticated in desert regions of the Middle East to provide food, clothing, and a means of transport. Camels are known for their ability to go long periods of time without water as well as little to no food. The camel’s hump is not for water storage, but is in fact a mound of fatty tissue. When this animal has to drink, it can consume 30 gallons within a short time. Camels can also eat large amounts of food within a short time. This is due to the fact a camel gulps down its food without chewing it first. It later regurgitates the undigested food and chews it in cud form. Even though a camel has long thin legs with powerful muscles, it can only gallop at a maximum speed of 12 miles per hour.

Dromedary Camel

Llama

Llama

Scientific Name: Lama glama

Range: Southern Peru through western Bolivia, northeast Argentina and northeast Chile
Height: 3.5-4 feet at shoulder
Weight: 150-350 lbs.
Gestation: 11-12 months

The llama was first domesticated by the Indians of Peru around 4,000 years ago. The llama is known for its surefooted travels in high mountain areas. It’s docile by nature can also be stubborn. When upset a llama may spit a foul smelling liquid. At The Lazy 5, that means if they want feed they usually get it. Llamas are used as pack animals and can carry loads up to 130 lbs. for up to 10-20 miles a day over rugged slopes in high altitudes, but they are not ridden. When weary or overloaded llamas just lie down and refuse to move. The llama is often referred to as the “South American Camel.” It’s long, coarse wool is used in the weaving of textiles.

Japanese Imperial Koi Fish

Scientific Name: Cyprinus carpio

Habitat: Originated in Persia and spread throughout the ancient world
Young: up to 5,000 eggs laid in a single spawning

Koi reach about 50% of their final adult weight at 24 months, 95% at 10 years and 99% at 14 years. Koi gain the most amount of weight at the age of 3 years, when they can gain almost 1/4 lb. a month. The growth of the scales is proportional to the Koi’s growth and annual marks are formed on the scales at the same time every year along the outer edges. This means that a Koi’s scales tell its age, just like the annual rings in the cross section of a tree.

Japanese Imperial Koi Fish

Ring-tail Lemur

Ring-tail Lemur

Scientific Name: Lemur catta

Range: Madagasgar
Lemurs are primates.

Lemurs have large eyes and an opposable large toe and thumb. Their hind legs are larger than their front legs enabling them to jump great distances. Ring-tailed Lemurs are very shy and timid, but also very playful. This lemur is diurnal meaning they are active during the day rather than night. They live in large groups with an equal number of each sex. In contrast to other lemur species, this species is primarily a ground dweller. The offspring consistently cling to the mother for the first three months of life. The baby can get around by itself in approximately seven months.

Despite reproducing readily in captivity and being the most populous lemur in zoos worldwide, numbering more than 2,000 individuals, the ring-tailed lemur is listed as endangered. As of early 2017, the population in the wild is believed to have crashed as low as 2,000 individuals.

Peccary (Javelina)

Scientific Name:

Range:
Length:
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Life Span:

Peccary (Javelina)

African Spur Thigh Tortoise

African Spur Thigh Tortoise

Also Called Sulcata Tortoise Scientific Name: Geochelone sulcata

Range: Southern Sahara desert region ranging from Senegal, Mauritania, Mali, Chad, Sudan, Ethiopia
Length: 36 inches
Weight: 240 lbs.
Life Span: up to 100 Years

These Tortoises are solitary and very territorial. Even females will compete with other tortoises that come into their feeding grounds or burrowing areas. Fights consist of ramming shells and trying to flip one another over. Like most tortoises, this species is an excellent digger. The spurs on the hind legs may serve as a defense against predators. Males search for females and must compete with neighboring males for breeding rights. The fights last until one tortoise flips the other over or one gives up.

What others are saying

"We had so much fun at this place! We did pay extra to take the wagon ride through rather than driving in our own vehicle and I definitely do recommend it! We got so many pictures hand feeding many different types of animals.The drivers of the wagons are very knowledgeable and provided great insight. This place doesn't really advertise much at all and it's quite a gem!!"
Leanna B
Tripadvisor
“Love this place. Great for kids. Affordable. Awesome experience. My two year old loved it. Lots of animals to see. We did the wagon ride. I think that is the best way to do it. Great guide. Given lots of information. My son got to feed a giraffe on the wagon ride.”
Meagan I
Google Reviews