Sheep & Goats

Our Sheep & Goats

Drive Through Pricing

Cash or NC check No Debit or Credit Cards Adult $11.00 Children (2-11) $8.00 Seniors (60+) $8.00 Feed $3.00 (64oz bucket)

Wagon Ride Pricing

SUSPENDED FOR COVID-19 Cash or NC check No Debit or Credit Cards Call for Reservations Adult $16.00 Children (2-11) $11.00 Seniors (60+) $11.00 1 bucket included for every 2 people Price includes admission

Hours of Operation

Monday-Friday 9am until 6:30pm, arrive by 5 Saturday 9am until 6:30pm, arrive by 4 Sunday 12pm until 6:30pm, arrive by 4

Sheep & Goat Facts

The bodies of wild sheep are covered by a coat of thick hair to protect them from cold. This coat contains long, stiff hairs, called kemps, over a short, woolly undercoat. This woolly undercoat has been developed in many domestic sheep breeds into a fleece of long wool. Goats are related to sheep and are the world's oldest domesticated animal. Since they are browsers, they will eat a wider variety of plants, vines and bushes.

Nubian Goat

Scientific Name: Capra hircus

Domestic Breed: Africa, India and Egypt
Height: Male: 35 inches at shoulder / Females: at least 30 inches at shoulder
Weight: Males: 175 lbs. or over / Females: 135 lbs. or over
Gestation: 151 days

The Nubian goat is named for Nubia, in Northeastern Africa. The head is the distinctive breed characteristic with the facial profile between the eyes and the muzzle being strongly convex. Their ears are droopy, wide and long, extending at least one inch beyond the nose when held flat along the face. These goats have adapted to habitats including savanna, desert, scrub, and mountains. They have an efficient four-chambered stomach that allows them to survive on a low-quality plant diet. Nubian goats are also known for their high-quality, high butterfat milk production.

Nubian Goat

African Pygmy Goat

African Pygmy Goat

Scientific Name: Capra hircus

Domestic Breed: West Africa
Height: 16-23 inches at shoulder
Weight: Males: avg. 90lbs. / Females: avg. 70 lbs.
Young: One to Four

Both sexes of the African Pygmy Goat have horns. They are vegetarians that prefer to browse to pasture. To reach high branches they stand on their hind legs. They are agile climbers due in part to the hair that grows between their hooves and gives them traction on smooth surfaces. When threatened, the herd will form a ring with the pregnant females and young in the center. Single births are common the first time, but after that twins or triplets are not uncommon. Their hair is short and fine during the summer, but that can adapt to colder climates by producing a thick, woolly undercoat.

Himalayan Tahr Goat

Scientific name: Hemitragus jemahicus

Range: India: Kashmir (Pir Pamjal Mountains) Punjab; Nepal; Sikkim
Height: 24-42 inches
Weight: 79-789 lbs.Life Span: 17-20 Years

This is the only species of the Bovidae family that is related to both sheep and goats. Adult males travel alone or in small groups, except during the breeding season. Females and young live in herds of 5 to 50. Tahr goats graze early in the morning and late in the afternoon. During the heat of the day they prefer to seek shelter in the woods. They are quick, sharp-sighted, active, and sure-footed on rocky ground. One or more stands guard during hours of rest, and if they sense danger, they whistle an alarm to head for safety.

Himalayan Tahr Goat

Aoudad

Aoudad

Scientific Name: Ammotragus levia

Range: northern Algeria to central Mauritania, east to west Egypt and west Sudan
Height: 30-40 inches
Weight: Males: 220-308 lbs. Females: 88-121 lbs.
Life Span: 20 years in captivity

On a stump, fallen tree, or running up a steep rocky slope is where you are most likely to see our Aoudad. Aoudad are expert climbers and are often seen running at “top gun” speeds up very steep slopes. Where you are least likely to see Aoudad at The Lazy 5 is at the creek or pond. Aoudad can survive up to five days without access to fresh water. When you see an Aoudad there are likely to be many more nearby, as they are herd animals and usually travel in groups compromised of old and young animals of both sexes. Although Aoudad are called sheep, they are more closely related to goats. Unlike the young of sheep which are called lambs, Aoudad young are called kids. Because they have excellent sight, hearing and sense of smell, it’s almost impossible to sneak up on one of these animals.

Angora Goat

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Angora Goat

Suffolk Sheep

Suffolk Sheep

Scientific Name: Ovis aries

Habitat: England
Height: up to 44 inches at shoulder
Weight: Males: 250-350 lbs. Females: 180-250 lbs.
Mating Season: August through Fall

The Suffolk sheep were developed in southeastern England. The original Suffolk breed was the result of crossing Southdown Rams (male sheep) with Norfolk horned ewes. The Suffolk sheep was recognized as its own breed as early as 1810. The first Suffolk were brought into this country in 1888 by Mr. G. B. Streeter of Chazy, NY. Like the Southdown, Suffolk sheep are naturally hornless.

Dorset Sheep

Scientific Name: Ovis aries

Domestic Breed: The Dorset breed was developed in England and was imported to the United States in 1885
Weight: Males (Rams): 210-250 lbs. Females (Ewes): 140-175 lbs.
Life Span: 10-12

Dorset sheep have little wool on the face, legs and belly. Their wool (fleece) is lightweight and is good for hand spinning. The horns of the ram are large and angular and spiral downward and forward. The horns of the ewe are smaller and flatter and curve down and forward but don’t spiral. Sheep are followers by nature and will instinctively flock and move together. The gestation period is about 21 weeks, with twins or triplets being common occurrence. Most ewes need no help lambing (giving birth). Lambs are born feet first and delivery takes about 2 hours. Lambs nurse for about 16 weeks. Ewes are good mothers and good milkers.

 

Dorset Sheep

What others are saying

"We make a stop here everytime we come to town. It’s always so fun and such a great time. The kids love it. It’s such a unique and different experience. Can’t beat it.”
Ciera A
Tripadvisor
“This is a beautiful place to get right into the trails with the animals. Make a reservation on a wagon ride for a much better experience than driving through with your car. Then walk through the petting zoo. They have picnic tables so bring your cooler and have lunch.”
Laurie D
Google Reviews